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  #16  
16th August 2011, 10:34 PM
tunedwolf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 435
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weirdfish
Hi again Tuned Wolf,
I have had to get back to you because I'm thinking I have misunderstood this post?
I have spoken to my local garage who do my tyres etc on the SV and the main dealer mechanic from the Suzuki Dealership and they are both saying that the oil should have got down to the lower chamber where the damper rod is? I am very confused!?
This is correct, the oil will go to the lower chamber...initially. When you pump the leg a couple of times briskly, this should prime the damper rod, and the oil should then be trapped in the upper chamber while the slide cyclinder is covering the damper rod holes, i.e when the stanchion is fully depressed. If the damper is not working properly the oil will drain back into the lower chamber again. Chamber here refers to the free space above (upper) and below (lower or lower plus rebound) the damper rod piston ring. If you move the stanchion upwards by a smidge, the holes will no longer be behind the seal and the oil will be free to run back to the lower chamber. Also, the amount of oil quoted is for stock springs and spacers, this is because the springs have a known volume. Aftermarket springs will have differing volumes, so it would be required to recalculate the amount of oil required for each set respectively to set the compression damping.

I'm at a loss to explain why the dealer would have told you to just keep topping it up until the correct level is reached, particularly when their own workshop manual clearly explains how to prime and measure it. I can only assume that this is what "they" do when folks have worn fork components, but don't want to spend the money to rectify the problem.
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  #17  
17th August 2011, 10:01 AM
Weirdfish
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddyspetey44
i got a large diameter syringe from halfords (it was for bleeding brakes)and clear tubing to fit the end it was clamped lightly to the end of the fork tube set at the depth of 125mm and added oil then syphoned out the extra until i drew air that told me that the oil was at the 125mm level,it was the easiest way to ensure the right depth,i think the syringe unit was something like a 5,if you know your local vet they would have them(slightly smaller) for dispensing metacam anti-inflamatory for dogs and cats,eddyr
Very igenious and there was me going to use a ruler!
  #18  
17th August 2011, 10:03 AM
Weirdfish
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tunedwolf
This is correct, the oil will go to the lower chamber...initially. When you pump the leg a couple of times briskly, this should prime the damper rod, and the oil should then be trapped in the upper chamber while the slide cyclinder is covering the damper rod holes, i.e when the stanchion is fully depressed. If the damper is not working properly the oil will drain back into the lower chamber again. Chamber here refers to the free space above (upper) and below (lower or lower plus rebound) the damper rod piston ring. If you move the stanchion upwards by a smidge, the holes will no longer be behind the seal and the oil will be free to run back to the lower chamber. Also, the amount of oil quoted is for stock springs and spacers, this is because the springs have a known volume. Aftermarket springs will have differing volumes, so it would be required to recalculate the amount of oil required for each set respectively to set the compression damping.

I'm at a loss to explain why the dealer would have told you to just keep topping it up until the correct level is reached, particularly when their own workshop manual clearly explains how to prime and measure it. I can only assume that this is what "they" do when folks have worn fork components, but don't want to spend the money to rectify the problem.
Aha thats clearer, to be fair they say to pump it up and down but didn't explain why very clearly, perhaps they were assuming I had some knowledge on the subject!
Many thanks once again.


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